This strand of the Post-Covid Theology Project is focused on what it means to be human which theologians often refer to as theological anthropology. It explores what it means to be human, fragile and mortal, particularly at this specific point in history, with its unique challenges. Whilst some of these questions are directly a consequence of the coronavirus pandemic others are linked to other events such as the killing of George Floyd and the increasing consciousness around race and injustice.  It asks questions around how we live with risk, how we understand our physical presence and its role in relationships, and the meaning of physicality within our faith.  

These questions arose out of a number of online meetings between theologians and practitioners from Anglican, Baptist, Catholic and Quaker backgrounds. The questions are grouped into four sections.  

Being Human (Theological Anthropology) questions (pdf) – A series of questions grouped around various themes.

There are also 6 short essays reflecting on various topics related to the questions.

Anthropological reflections on race and identity (pdf) by Israel Olofinjana (Evangelical Alliance)

Good news in an age of blame and risk (pdf) by Benjamin Woods (Woodbrooke College)

Justice and BLM… (pdf) by Carlton Turner (Queens Foundation)

Pandemic vision (pdf) by Sally Nelson (St Hild College)

Real presence (pdf) by Gemma Simmonds (Margaret Beaufort Institute of Theology)

Thinking through our fragile, graced creaturehood (pdf) by Ben Fulford (Chester University)

We hope that these resources may be useful for local and regional church leaders, local churches together groups or anyone looking for “a starter for 10” as we emerge from the pandemic.